09/22/2020

ORIGINS scientistTil Birnstiel is receiving the 2020 Astrophysical Software Award of the German Astronomical Society for the software he developed for modelling the temporal and spatial evolution of dust in protoplanetary disks. Young stars and the disks around them are built up from interstellar matter which initially contains only very small, at most micrometer-sized, dust particles. Til Birnstiel has written codes describing the mechanisms which lead to the growth of grains over several orders of magnitude in mass and to study how they are distributed and transported in…

more

09/09/2020 The “IceCube” neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies. In order to investigate the cosmic origins of elementary particles with even higher energies, Prof. Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now started an international initiative to build a neutrino telescope several cubic kilometers in size in the northeastern Pacific.

more
Sherry Suyu

07/30/2020 Astrophysicist Sherry H. Suyu will receive the 2021 Lancelot M. Berkeley–New York Community Trust Prize for Meritorious Work in Astronomy. Bestowed annually since 2011 by the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and supported by a grant from the New York Community Trust, the Berkeley prize includes a monetary award and an invitation to give the closing plenary lecture at the AAS winter meeting, the “Super Bowl of Astronomy.” The 237th AAS meeting will be held virtually from 11 to 15 January 2021.

more
Part of the accelerator ring at KEK

06/26/2020 Tailwind for the search for rare particle decays in the Belle II experiment: The SuperKEKB accelerator ring has now achieved the highest luminosity ever measured. The electron-positron accelerator beats not only its predecessor KEKB but also the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. This has just been announced by the Japanese research center KEK, the operator of the accelerator.

more
The energetic universe as seen with the eROSITA X-ray telescope.

06/19/2020 Over the course of 182 days, the eROSITA X-ray telescope onboard SRG has completed its first full sweep of the sky. This new map of the hot, energetic universe contains more than one million objects, roughly doubling the number of known X-ray sources discovered over the 60-year history of X-ray astronomy. Most of the new sources are active galactic nuclei at cosmological distances, marking the growth of gigantic black holes over cosmic time. Clusters of galaxies in the new map will be used to track the growth of cosmic structures and constrain cosmological parameters.…

more
[Translate to English:] Open ALICE Experiment

05/27/2020 Since anti-matter could be interpreted as a dark matter annihilation signal, satellite and balloon experiments are currently hunting for dark matter particles near Earth. But anti-matter could also be produced by interactions of high-energy cosmic rays with the interstellar medium. To better understand the production mechanism and the annihilation of anti-matter, the ALICE collaboration has conducted a comprehensive study of the yield of anti-matter resulting from proton-proton collisions and evaluated for the first time the cross section of anti-deuteron at low energies.

more

05/08/2020 Great honour for ORIGINS scientist Volker Springel: the director at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy is being awarded the 2020 Gruber Cosmology Prize for his defining contributions to cosmological simulations. Springel shares the $500,000 prize with Lars Hernquist of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The researchers have developed methods to test existing theories about the formation of structures at every scale from stars to galaxies to the universe itself. Springel and Hernquist developed numerical algorithms and community codes which are used by many…

more

04/06/2020 The Belle II experiment started almost exactly one year ago. The renowned journal Physical Review Letters has now published the initial results of the detector. The work deals with a new particle in the context dark matter, which – according to current knowledge – accounts for about 25 percent of the Universe.

more

01/08/2020 Members of the H0LiCOW team led by ORIGINS Scientist Sherry Suyu at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics and the Technical University of Munich used a number of telescopes and a technique that is completely independent of any previous method to measure the universe's expansion rate, a value called the Hubble constant. The researchers' result further strengthens a troubling discrepancy between the expansion rate calculated from measurements of the local universe and the rate as predicted from background radiation in the early universe. The new study adds evidence to the…

more

10/14/2019 ESO astronomer and ORIGINS Scientist Dr. Leonardo Testi together with Patrick Hennebelle from CEA Paris-Saclay in France, Ralf Klessen from the University of Heidelberg in Germany, and Sergio Molinari from the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Rome, Italy, were awarded with up to €12.6 million by the European Research Council (ERC) for the project "ECOGAL – Understanding our Galactic ecosystem: From the disk of the Milky Way to the formation sites of stars and planets". This project is one of only 37 synergy grants to be funded by the ERC in 2019 and the only one in the…

more